InterTREKtional: Picard

27
Jan

All of This Has Happened Before (Episode 1: Remembrance) Episode Notes

January 27, 2020

InterTREKtional Season 3: Picard! is here with your first dose of feminist analysis of Star Trek: Picard. Episode 1: Remembrance. *****SPOILERS ABOUND***** Data is pretty busy playing poker, painting, and teaching cryptic lessons about bluffing in Picard's dreams. While awake, Jean-Luc takes his tea sans caffeine (but continues to indulge in the real stuff where wine is concerned), shares his home with kindly Romulan refugees, and bombs a cable news interview.  He meets a very special graduate student named Dahj and pledges his eternal assistance and protection to her for reasons we won't reveal in this summary. 9/11 is still on Michael Chabon's mind. 

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Spoilers after the photo!

 

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Dahj’s boyfriend getting stabbed by ninjas is an example of the “Black Dude Dies First” trope. Black Dudes Die First via TV Tropes

Becca notes that this same character is an example of people of color being cast as alien characters. In Star Trek, Worf, Tuvok, and B’Elanna are examples of this phenomenon.

His death is an example of a dead lover being used as motivation for a hero.  The Lost Lenore via TV Tropes

cylonsss.jpg

Seriously, all of this has happened before and all of this will happened again. Not complaining, though!

Dahj is an example of the trope where a hot girl who seems normal is actually ninja, like River from Firefly. Badass Adorable via TV Tropes

She is also a super talented killer unaware of her own origin story, like Jason Bourne, and a sleeper agent who doesn’t know she is an android, like Boomer from Battlestar Galactica

Check out the Our Opinions are Correct episode, “It’s time to stop quoting Clarke’s third law”, advice I am pretty sure we violate by discussing this podcast in our own podcast.

Ryan is pretty sure the background premise for Picard is an allegory for America's military history in the aughts, specifically the fact that the Iraq War was a response to 9/11, and yet Iraq had nothing to do with 9/11. via Vox.com

Growing distrust of institutions in America: Americans Distrust the Government via Pew Research

ussmegababe.jpgCaptain Jean-Luc Picard, USS Mega-Babe

Emancipation does not automatically lead to violent revenge, via Stanford University.

Episodes & Movies referenced

LOLLAL.jpg1990: a time of bobbed hair, center parts, and zero eyebrow pencils

Also referenced:  Outlander, Dark Angel, and, most importantly, Battlestar Galactica.

whytfnot.jpgPicard clone can get it